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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
to be worse than the private markets. in contrast in a speech in california in may, and it romney's said "the president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one company makes a harder for technology generally because other entrepreneurs of the same field their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar capital -- company when the government picked one of their choice? excellent question. i wrote the book we're spending about $12 billion per year to make electricity more expensive. that it is 6 billion of tax breaks and direct and chairs. this makes no sense in hers low income americans. we brainwashed children toothache greed it is good to think about green products and jobs that yet to we cannot define what a green job it is. that has five definitions of the green job as a discounted. energy from renewable sources. energy efficiency. energy pollution reduction in removal. natural resource conservation. environmental compliance education and training and public awareness. when i was testifying on capitol hill, they had a paper cup in front of me. most the time
that we have over the past five years. in california in may, mitt romney said, quote, the president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one solar energy company makes it harder for solar technology generally because the scores from the ranch partners in the field suddenly lost their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar company when the government puts half a billion into one of its choice? excellent question. i wrote this book because were not just spending half a billion. we are spending $12 billion year-to-date electricity more expensive rather than cheaper. that's about six elion and tax breaks and 6 billion in direct expenditures. we are pursuing a vision of green jobs that makes no sense and has low income americans. we brainwash our children to think green is good and think uncritically about green products and green jobs. yet we can't even define what a green job aids. let's start with green jobs. the bureau of labor statistics has five definitions of the 3.1 million green jobs is calculated, namely energy from renewable sources, energy effici
with the soviet union. states like georgia and texas and florida and other california and north carolina were all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift of influence. from 1964 until 2008, it was a period of sun belt dominance. if you think about every president elected from 1994 until 2008, comes from the state of the sun belt. richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected, he was never even elected vice president. so there you go. jimmy carter, ronald reagan, bill clinton from arkansas and bush from texas. the 2008, it ends with forty-year period. and there were issues that were critical into politics that came out of the sun belt. also, it is on the sun belt and in the south and southwest that we see the lives by the 1970s
. why did he move to california? what were his parents like? >> okay, now we're getting into a tricky area. so father was the son of irish immigrant and he had traveled around as an itinerant without a lot of different things. he was kind of talk to her about the adventures. he had been a minor. her mother was a first-generation german immigrant and her mother had been married before. her mother was -- her mother came over as a child, ended up staying and eventually married a man named vendor. they moved up to test your mother said it was? i think north dakota and he was killed in a flood of fire. actually, i chide very hard to find information about the flood that killed him. i called the archives, spoke to the archivist and really could not find a tremendous amount of information about her mother sirs has been. from that marriage, she did have two children and then she married will ryan and the move to nevada. they make to several dilettantes in nevada and he was a minor. but she has lost one has been to mining and did not want to lose another one. she was constantly putting pressur
of california and the ninth circuit, and then write out of boston there's the gay and lesbian advocates and defenders and they are bringing what is the most effective case against the so-called defensive marriage act, doma and we will find out whether the supreme court will take up one or more or any of those cases and then have -- we should have a ruling by next june. so, is a big moment for marriage and marriage equality and it felt appropriate to write about this and i will tell you a little bit about why intended it for. the book is laid out in the conversation between me and someone who would describe themselves as reasonably tolerant of gay and lesbian people also tolerance isn't all it's cracked up to be. i have a friend who says that the only thing one should have to tolerate is hemorrhoids. [laughter] perhaps a little overstated. but if you for ever been on the receiving end of tolerance it doesn't feel all that much better than intolerance. if someone is begrudgingly at mending your right to exist it just doesn't feel all that warm and fuzzy. so, i imagine a conversations and
be curious to know a little bit about her family, in nevada. what did her father do, why move to california? what were his parents like, what were her mother's parents like? >> we're getting into a tricky area. her father was the son of irish immigrants and he had to travel around -- she did a lot of things. he would talk about his good ventures. he had been made minor. term mother was a first-generation german immigrant and her mother had been married before. her mother was -- her mother came over as a child and stayed and eventually married a man named bender. we move to what the code did we decide it was? north dakota and he was killed in a flood up there. actually, i tried hard to find information about the flood that killed him. i called the archives, i spoke to the archivist and could not find a lot of information about her mother's first husband. from that marriage she had two children. than she married will ryan and they moved to nevada, several towns in nevada and he was a minor. she lost one husband to mining and did not want to lose another one. she was constantly putting pressur
that about her family, born in nevada? what did her father do there? why did he move to california? what were his parents like, her mother's parents like? >> okay, now we're getting into a tricky area. so, her father was the son of irish immigrants, and he had traveled around as an itinerant, he done a lot of different things to get it on a merchant ship. he would talk to her about his adventures, and he had been a minor. her mother was a first generation german immigrant, and her mother had been married before. her mother was, her mother came over as a child within and, ended up staying and eventually, eventually married a man named bender. they moved up to what dakota did was decide it was? was? ivory coast north dakota. moved up to north dakota, and he was killed in a flight up there. now, actually i tried very hard to find information about the floods that killed him. i called the archives. i called, spoke to the archivist and really could not find commit is a lot of information about her mother's first husband. from that marriage she did have two children. and then they moved, then she m
move to california? what were his parents late, her mother's parents late? >> okay, now we are getting into a tricky area. so her father was the son of irish immigrants and he had traveled around sn -- she had done a lot of different things. he would kind of talk to her about these adventures. he had been a minor. her mother was a first-generation german immigrant and hermit there had been very before. her mother came over as a child with an aunt, up staying and eventually married a man named ender. they moved up to, what decoded to recite it was? i think is north dakota. the debt to north dakota and he was killed in a flood up there. actually, i tried very hard to find permission about the flood that killed him. i called the archives. i spoke to the archivist and really could not find a tremendous amount of information about her mother's first test in. from that marriage, she did have two children. then she married will o'bryan and they moved to nevada. actually so the little towns in nevada and he was a minor. but she had lost one has been to miami in she did not want to lose another
the university of california santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a variety of things. as a rock drummer he was part of several groups one of which opened for steppenwolf among other performers for those old enough to remember that. his first film, rocking the wall about rock music had spared in bringing down communism started airing on pbs this weekend will continue throughout this year. he serves on the faculty at the university of dayton where he has talked business, economic history and military history, he is the author of a dozen books including first, a patriot's history of the united states which he co-authored. other topics on which he is written include national defence, history, the u.s. economy. a television series based on winklevoss is currently in development as well. we are pleased to welcome juan williams to hear about his newest book, winklevoss which in this case will be from 1898 -- winklevoss -- a patriot's history of the modern world. >> thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it is an
his doctorate from the university of california santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a vary of -- variety of rock bands. he was part of several groups, one of which opened for steppen wolf among other performers for those old enough to remember them. his first film, "rocking the wall," began airing on pbs this week and will continue throughout this year. dr. schweikart serves on the faculty at the university of dayton where he has taught business, economic history as well as military history. he is the author of more than a dozen books including, first, "a patriot's history of the united states," which he co-authored. other topics on which he has written include national defense, history and histography and the u.s. economy. a television series based upon "patriot's history of the united states" is currently in development as well. we are pleased to welcome dr. schweikart to hear about his newest book, "a patriot's v. of the modern world -- version of the modern world." please join me in welcoming larry schweikart.
like georgia and texas and florida and southern california and north carolina, i mean, just think about it. this. from 1964 to 2008, it is a period -- a president elected from those years from 1964 to 2008, they were from the sun belt states. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. it ends this forty-year period. there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed. it tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense and in opposition to unions and the defense of free enterprise policy. also it is in the sun belt, the south and southwest of the see the sunrise of the 1970s to talk about the religious right. the rise of evangelical and fundamentalist voters. national defense, he was a staunch economist who played an important role in populist politics in the late 50s and early 1960s. one of the things that led this to switch parties in 1964. he was opposing labor unions.
for the big items to come up, currently there is an initiative in california launched by the american bar association to promote the international criminal court and to get the u.s. to join the international criminal court and they are paying for members of the court to come here and meet with american judges. they see this as a long-term process. this is a long-term thing even after they die they hope this is a goal that they will someday reach and we should look at that in protecting the american republic and sometimes it is disturbing to people on our side that says, i mean those that would like to see the american republic survive as long as it possibly can. nothing is forever, so this republic is also not going to last forever. i don't know if that is true because we don't know the future and i will stick with john adams it's rare to last forever and i went to try to make it that way. [applause] >> you are watching book tv on c-span2. joining us now in the studio is malcolm, the founder and the chairman of the foundation of the american writers museum. very quickly, what is the ameri
beyond the louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. now after this rather less than lengthy preface. why lincoln rejected all meaningful comprise which meant the territories. but there must be one thing more. i'm going talk about three different men tonight. one of you, one of them all of you know know his name abraham lincoln what he was and what he did. the other two not so well known. probably a number of you are familiar with henry clay. the great kentucky statesman. probably few know of william henry in 1860 was a senator from new york state and prior to lincoln's nomination for the presidency, was by far the most notable and well known republican in the country. finally, here i am. ready to start. >>> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. from the jefferson library in char latesville -- relationship to slavery. he reports that -- ownership and labor of the slaifts but america's third president called silent professionals. and jeffrey jefferson's papers in the research. it's just over an hour. >>> our guest speaker this afternoon is henry w
things that money can't buy. if you're sentenced to a jail term in santa barbara, california -- just in case that happens to any one of you -- [laughter] you should know that if you don't like the standard accommodations, you can buy a prison cell upgrade. laugh -- [laughter] it's true. for how much, do you suppose? how much do you think it costs? >> $5,000? it's on a nightly basis. $90 a night. or if you're a tourist, suppose you go to washington, d.c., you want to sit in on a congressional hearing, but there may be a very long line if it's a popular hearing, and you might like standing on long lines. you can now go to a company called line-standing.com -- [laughter] pay them a certain amount of money. they will hire someone -- usually a homeless person or someone who needs the work -- to hold the place online for hours and hours, overnight if need be, and when the hearing begins, you can take your place in the line and go into the hearing room. the same thing, you can do the same thing, by the way, if you want to sit in on an oral argument before the u.s. supreme court. linestandin
for our guest here in miami is patricia in cottonwood, california. patricia, you're on booktv. go ahead with your question or comment for neil barofsky. .. >> guest: well, first of all, thank you. that really feels great. you know, writing a book like this, it's a challenge writing about the bailout, and what i really tried to do was to make it accessible and understandable, and when i had the job in washington, special inspector general, that was the montra. i called it t.a.r.p. 101, it was put out so the american taxpayers, those paying for the program could really understand what was going on. it was the goal so it feels particularly good to hear the really kind comments that you just said. as far as the next book, i'm sort of recovering from this book. i really did it as a first time author, i did enjoy the process, and i really -- it was something that was, you know, you never know when you go on add veepture or journey in producing a book what it will be like, i am interested in writing something else, but i have not seen the topic to sink teeth into, but i want to write a seg boo
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)